Related to: '100 Things They Don't Want You To Know'

Quercus

100 Things You Will Never Find

Daniel Smith
Authors:
Daniel Smith

What happened to Amelia Earhart's aeroplane, Van Gogh's painting of Dr Gachet and the crew of the Mary Celeste? This fascinating book unlocks the world's lost property cupboard and sifts through buried treasure, mysterious disappearances and unknown locations, examining the evidence - and the conspiracy theories - surrounding the world's most legendary lost objects. Who erased the Nixon tapes? Did Captain Kidd really bury his treasure on Rhode Island? Is Lord Lucan still alive? Ranging from a single gemstone (the Great Mogul Diamond) to hoards of jewels (treasure of the Knights Templar), and from a single man (Australian prime minister Harold Holt) to swathes of people (the Lost Army of Cambyses), via Shergar the stolen horse, the top secret recipe for KFC, the fifth spy in the 'Cambridge Five', the much-coveted Holy Grail and the sunken Tybee Island Bomb, Dan Smith shines a torch into the darkest theories and examines the hidden truth. A fascinating catalogue of lost things, 100 Things You Will Never Find will take you on a unique quest around the globe and across the centuries, searching for the legendary items that have inspired generations of explorers, scientists and storytellers alike. Contents include: Amelia Earhart's Aeroplane, Muhammed Ali's Gold Medal, Loch Ness Monster, Log of Columbus's First Voyage, Google's Search Algorithms, Atlantis, Missing Apollo II Tapes, Montezuma's Treasure, Lord Lucan, Final Panels of the Bayeux Tapestry, Formula for WD-40, Hemingway's Lost Manuscripts, Jules Rimet Trophy, Lost City of Z, Raoul Wallenberg, Missing Nixon Tapes, Lord Byron's Memoirs and a Complete Dodo Skeleton.

Quercus

100 Things You Will Never Do

Daniel Smith
Authors:
Daniel Smith
Quercus

100 Places You Will Never Visit

Dan Smith, Daniel Smith
Authors:
Dan Smith, Daniel Smith

Ever wondered what it takes to get into Fort Knox? Fancied a peek inside the Coca-Cola Safety Deposit Box? Would you dare to visit Three Mile Island? The world is full of secret places that we either don't know about, or couldn't visit even if we wanted to. Now you can glimpse the Tora Bora caves in Afghanistan, visit the Tuscon Titan Missile Site, tour the Vatican Archives, or see the Chapel of the Ark. This fascinating guide book takes a look at 100 places around the world that are either so hard to reach, so closely guarded, or so secret that they are virtually impossible to visit any other way.

Alison Littlewood

Alison Littlewood is the author of A Cold Season, published by Jo Fletcher Books. The novel was selected for the Richard and Judy Book Club, where it was described as "perfect reading for a dark winter's night." Her most recent novel, The Hidden People, has recently been published to critical acclaim.Alison's short stories have been picked for Best British Horror 2015, The Best Horror of the Year and The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror anthologies, as well as The Best British Fantasy 2013 and The Mammoth Book of Best British Crime 10. She also won the 2014 Shirley Jackson Award for Short Fiction with her story The Dog's Home, published in The Spectral Book of Horror Stories.Alison lives with her partner Fergus in Yorkshire, England, in a house of creaking doors and crooked walls. You can talk to her on twitter @Ali__L, see her on Facebook and visit her at www.alisonlittlewood.co.uk.

Andreas Norman

Andreas Norman worked for the Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs for ten years on security issues and Counter-Terrorism. He has also worked for the Swedish think-tank UI and published a book of a poetry. Now a full-time writer, Into a Raging Blaze is his first novel. He lives in Malmö, Sweden.

Andrey Kurkov

Born near Leningrad in 1961, Kurkov was a journalist, prison warder, cameraman and screenplay-writer before his novels took off. He received "hundreds of rejections" and was a pioneer of self-publishing, selling more than 75,000 copies of his books in a single year. His novel Death and the Penguin, his first in English translation, was an international bestseller, drawing acclaim from all quarters. He lives in Kiev with his English wife and their three children.

Anna Smith

Anna Smith has been a journalist for over twenty years and is a former chief reporter for the Daily Record in Glasgow. She has covered wars across the world as well as major investigations and news stories from Dunblane to Kosovo to 9/11. Anna spends her time between Lanarkshire and Dingle in the west of Ireland, as well as in Spain to escape the British weather.

Carolina Sanín

Carolina Sanín is a Colombian author and academic, born in Bogotá in 1973. She studied for a Ph.D in Hispanic Literature at Yale University and has taught at the State University of New York and the University of Los Andes. Her previous works include novels, essays, short stories and writing for children. The Children was first published in Spanish in 2014 and is Sanín's first to appear in English.

Corban Addison

Corban Addison holds degrees in law and engineering. After completing a federal clerkship, Addison began his career specializing in corporate law and litigation. He has an abiding interest in international human rights, and is a supporter of numerous causes, including the abolition of modern slavery. He lives with his wife and two children in Virginia. He is the author of A Walk Across the Sun, The Garden of Burning Sand and The Tears of Dark Water.

Damien Lewis

Damien Lewis has spent twenty years reporting from war, disaster and conflict zones around the world. He has written a dozen non-fiction and fiction books, topping bestseller lists worldwide, and is published in some thirty languages. Two of his books are being made into feature films.

Daniel Smith

Daniel Smith is the bestselling author of 100 Places You Will Never Visit, which has been translated into eight languages. He has written more than fifteen books, on subjects as diverse as Sherlock Holmes, cockney rhyming slang and the WWII Dig for Victory campaign. Daniel is also a long-time contributor to The Statesman's Yearbook, an annual geopolitical guide to the countries of the world. He lives in London.

Derek Wilson

Derek Wilson is an award-winning historian and author of the high acclaimed biographies of Hans Holbein and Sir Francis Walsingham, and The Uncrowned Kings of England. He runs the annual Cambridge History festival and lives in Devon. His website is: www.derekwilson.com.

Dominic Dulley

Dominic Dulley is a software developer with a passion for SF. His short fiction has been published widely, in books, journals and magazines. Shattermoon is his first novel, and the start of the fast-moving space opera The Long Game. He lives with his wife and family in Warwick.

Elly Griffiths

Elly Griffiths was born in London. She worked in publishing for many years. Her bestselling series of Dr Ruth Galloway novels, featuring a forensic archaeologist, are set in Norfolk. The series has won the CWA Dagger in the library, and has been shortlisted three times for the Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. Her Stephens and Mephisto series is based in 1950s Brighton. She lives near Brighton with her husband, an archaeologist, and their two children.

Ian Crofton

A former editor-in-chief of The Guinness Encyclopedia, Ian Crofton's authorial credits include Brewer's Britain and Ireland (2005) and the forthcoming 2nd edition of Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase and Fable (with John Ayto). He lives in North London with his family.

Kathryn Bonella

Kathryn Bonella lived in London for several years, freelancing for numerous English and American television programmes, magazines and newspapers. She returned to Australia in 2000 to work as a full-time TV producer. She moved to Bali in 2005 to research and write Schapelle Corby's bestselling autobiography, My Story. Subsequently she has written the international bestsellers Hotel K and Snowing in Bali.

Mary Hollingsworth

Mary Hollingsworth has a B.Sc. in business studies and a Ph.D. in art history. Her doctoral thesis dealt with the role of the architect in Italian Renaissance building projects and led to research on the role of the patron in the development of Renaissance art and architecture.

Massimo Ciancimino

Massimo Ciancimino was born in Palermo in 1963. He is the youngest son of Vito Ciancimino, and was barely eighteen when he was chosen by his father to be his aide and therefore initiated directly into the double life of the 'Mayor of the Corleones': a world that he was part of until his arrest on the 6th June 2006. Francesco La Licata is a journalist who has written for the Stampa since 1980. He recently collaborated with the national anti-mafia prosecutor, Pietro Grasso, to write Pizzini, veleni e cicoria: La mafia prima e dopo Provenzano (Feltrinelli 2008). N.S. Thompson is a poet, critic, and translator of Italian. Born in Manchester, he now lives and works in Oxford, UK, where he teaches literature at Christ Church.

Nigel Cawthorne

Nigel Cawthorne is the author of a number of successful popular history books. His writing has appeared in over 150 newspapers, magazines and partworks - from the Sun to the Financial Times, and from Flatbush Life to The New York Tribune. He lives in London.

Pierre Lemaitre

Pierre Lemaitre was born in Paris in 1951. He worked for many years as a teacher of literature before becoming a novelist. He was awarded the Crime Writers' Association International Dagger, alongside Fred Vargas, for Alex, and as sole winner for Camille. In 2013 his novel Au revoir là-haut (The Great Swindle, in English translation) won the Prix Goncourt, France's leading literary award.