Related to: 'A Room Full of Bones Review '

Quercus

The Dark Angel

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths
Quercus

The Vanishing Box

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

What do a murdered Brighton flowerseller, the death of Cleopatra and a nude tableau show have in common? One thing's for sure - it could be the most dangerous case yet for Stephens and Mephisto.The fourth Stephens and Mephisto mystery from the author of the bestselling Dr Ruth Galloway series - a must-read for fans of Bryant and May. 'Mixes cosiness and sharpness in a way that recalls the best of Agatha Christie' Sunday Express (on Smoke and Mirrors)Christmas 1953. Max Mephisto and his daughter Ruby are headlining Brighton Hippodrome, an achievement only slightly marred by the less-than-savoury support act: a tableau show of naked 'living statues'. This might appear to have nothing in common with DI Edgar Stephens' investigation into the death of a quiet flowerseller, but if there's one thing the old comrades have learned it's that, in Brighton, the line between art and life - and death - is all too easily blurred...

Quercus

The Blood Card

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

On the eve of the Queen's coronation, DI Stephens and Max Mephisto uncover an anarchist plot and a ticking bomb at the same time as solving the murder of a man close to them - from the author of the bestselling Dr Ruth Galloway mysteries.'Mixes cosiness and sharpness in a way that recalls the best of Agatha Christie' Sunday Express (on Smoke and Mirrors)Elizabeth II's coronation is looming, but the murder of their wartime commander, Colonel Cartwright, spoils the happy mood for DI Edgar Stephens and magician Max Mephisto. A playbill featuring another deceased comrade is found in Colonel Cartwright's possession, and a playing card, the ace of hearts: the blood card. The wartime connection and the suggestion of magic are for Stephens and Mephisto to be summoned to the case.Edgar's ongoing investigation into the death of Brighton fortune-teller Madame Zabini is put on hold. Max is busy rehearsing for a spectacular Coronation Day variety show - and his television debut - so it's Edgar who is sent to New York, a land of plenty worlds away from still-rationed England. He's on the trail of a small-town mesmerist who may provide the key, but someone silences him first. It's Edgar's colleague, DS Emma Holmes, who finds the clue, buried in the files of the Zabini case, that leads them to an anarchist group intent on providing an explosive finale to Coronation Day.Now it's up to Edgar, Max and Emma to foil the plot, and find out who it is who's been dealing the cards . . .

Quercus

The Chalk Pit

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

'I refuse to apologise for being in love with Dr Ruth Galloway and DCI Harry Nelson . . one of my favourite current crime series . . . a pleasure from start to finish' Val McDermidWINNER OF THE 2016 CWA DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY. Boiled human bones have been found in Norwich's web of underground tunnels. When Dr Ruth Galloway discovers they were recently buried, DCI Nelson has a murder enquiry on his hands. The boiling might have been just a medieval curiosity - now it suggests a much more sinister purpose.Meanwhile, DS Judy Johnson is investigating the disappearance of a local rough sleeper. The only trace of her is the rumour that she's gone 'underground'. This might be a figure of speech, but with the discovery of the bones and the rumours both Ruth and the police have heard that the network of old chalk-mining tunnels under Norwich is home to a vast community of rough sleepers, the clues point in only one direction. Local academic Martin Kellerman knows all about the tunnels and their history - but can his assertions of cannibalism and ritual killing possibly be true?As the weather gets hotter, tensions rise. A local woman goes missing and the police are under attack. Ruth and Nelson must unravel the dark secrets of The Underground and discover just what gruesome secrets lurk at its heart - before it claims another victim.

Quercus

The Last Act of Hattie Hoffman

Mindy Mejia
Authors:
Mindy Mejia

SUNDAY TIMES CRIME BOOK OF THE MONTH 'A haunting piece of fiction''Beautifully written . . . a future star in crime writing' Daily Mail'Utterly absorbing and original' Elly Griffiths, author of the Dr Ruth Galloway MysteriesNo one keeps more secrets. No one is better at hiding them. Full of twists and turns, with an ending you will never see coming and characters that will stay with you long after the book is finished, THE LAST ACT OF HATTIE HOFFMAN is a gripping psychological mystery perfect for fans of Emma Cline's THE GIRLS and Clare Mackintosh's I SEE YOU.Eighteen-year-old Hattie Hoffman is a talented actress, loved by everyone in her Minnesotan hometown. When she's found stabbed to death on the opening night of her school play, the tragedy rips through the fabric of the community.Sheriff Del Goodman, a close friend of Hattie's dad, vows to find her killer, but the investigation yields more secrets than answers: it turns out Hattie played as many parts offstage as on. Told from three perspectives, Del's, Hattie's high school English teacher and Hattie herself, The Last Act of Hattie Hoffman tells the story of the Hattie behind the masks, and what happened in that final year of her life. . .Wonderfully evocative of its Midwestern setting and with a cast of unforgettable characters, this is a book about manipulation of relationships and identity; about the line between innocence and culpability; about the hope love offers and the tragedies that occur when it spins out of control.

Quercus

A Room Full of Bones

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

WINNER OF THE 2016 CWA DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY. Halloween night, and the dead are closer than ever for Dr Ruth Galloway. She is used to long-dead bodies, but a fresh corpse in the middle of a museum is a new challenge. The fourth beguiling Dr Ruth Galloway mystery.'A wonderfully rich mix of ancient and contemporary' GuardianIt is Halloween in King's Lynn, and forensic archaeologist Dr Ruth Galloway is attending a strange event at the local history museum - the opening of a coffin containing the bones of a medieval bishop. But then Ruth finds the body of the museum's curator lying beside the coffin. Soon the museum's wealthy owner lies dead in his stables too. These two deaths could be from natural causes but DCI Harry Nelson isn't convinced, and it is only a matter of time before Ruth and Nelson cross paths once more. When threatening letters come to light, events take an even more sinister turn. But as Ruth's friends become involved, where will her loyalties lie? As her convictions are tested, she and Nelson must discover how Aboriginal skulls, drug smuggling and the Aboriginal ritual of The Dreaming may hold the answer to these deaths - and be the key to their own survival.

Quercus

The Janus Stone

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

WINNER OF THE 2016 CWA DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY. The discovery of a child's skeleton lays bare terrible secret's from Norwich's past in the second gripping mystery for Dr Ruth Galloway. A must-read for fans of Val McDermid and Ann Cleeves.'The setting is enticingly atmospheric . . . a really intelligent murder story' IndependentDr Ruth Galloway's forensic skills are called upon when builders, demolishing an old house in Norwich, uncover the bones of a child - minus the skull - beneath a doorway. Is it some ritual sacrifice or just plain straightforward murder? Ruth links up with DCI Harry Nelson to investigate. The house was once a children's home. Nelson traces the Catholic priest who used to run the place. He tells him that two children did go missing forty years before - a boy and a girl. They were never found. When carbon dating proves that the child's bones predate the home and relate to a time when the house was privately owned, Ruth is drawn ever more deeply into the case. But as spring turns into summer it becomes clear that someone is desperate to put her off the scent by frightening her to death...

Quercus

The Ghost Fields

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

WINNER OF THE 2016 CWA DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY. A bullet-ridden body is unearthed from a buried WW2 plane - but the body isn't from WW2. Dr Ruth Galloway must discover who the victim was, and who put him there, in this atmospheric mystery for fans of Val McDermid and Ann Cleeves.'An almost gothic plot, involving family feuds and a crumbling stately home . . . one of the most vivid novels in a delightful series' Sunday TimesWhen DCI Harry Nelson calls Ruth Galloway in to investigate a body found inside a buried fighter plane, she quickly realizes that the skeleton couldn't possibly be the pilot. DNA tests identify the man as Fred Blackstock, a local aristocrat who had been reported dead at sea. Events are further complicated by a TV company that wants to make a film about Norfolk's deserted air force bases, the so-called Ghost Fields, which have been partially converted into a pig farm run by one of the younger remaining Blackstocks. Then human bones are found on the farm and, as the greatest storm Norfolk has seen for decades brews in the distance, another Blackstock is attacked. Can the team outrace the rising flood to find the killer?

Quercus

A Dying Fall

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

WINNER OF THE 2016 CWA DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY. When murder strikes close to home, Dr Ruth Galloway is determined to find justice - without ending up in the firing line herself. A nailbiting new adventure for fans of Val McDermid and Ann Cleeves.'One of the most cinematic finales in recent crime fiction' Daily TelegraphDr Ruth Galloway, forensic archaeologist, spends a lot of time looking at death. But now death has found her, with the news that her long-time friend and ex-colleague Dan Golding has been killed in a house fire.Ruth's grief soon turns to suspicion of arson when she receives a desperate letter from Dan, sent the day before he died. He had made a ground-breaking discovery that he was sure would change archaeology forever - and was petrified of the consequences. Ruth feels compelled to travel north to investigate further, alongside DCI Harry Nelson who is also drawn into the case. But where Ruth goes, so does her young daughter, Kate. This time, the risks are even higher.

Quercus

The House at Sea's End

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths
Quercus

The Crossing Places

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

WINNER OF THE 2016 CWA DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY. A child's bones are discovered on the windswept Norfolk marshes. Believing them to be ancient, the police call in Dr Ruth Galloway, forensic archaeologist. But this is no prehistoric grave. It seems a cold missing person case has now become a murder investigation. A must-read for all crime fiction fans, particularly readers of Val McDermid and Ann Cleeves.'I've never before read a crime novel in which [archaeology and detection] blend as successfully as in The Crossing Places' Shots magazineDr Ruth Galloway is called in when a child's bones are discovered near the site of a pre-historic henge on the north Norfolk salt marshes. Are they the remains of a local girl who disappeared ten years earlier - or are the bones much older?DCI Harry Nelson refuses to give up the hunt for the missing girl. Since she vanished, someone has been sending him bizarre anonymous notes about ritual sacrifice, quoting Shakespeare and the Bible. He knows that Ruth's expertise and experience could help him finally to put this case to rest. But when a second child goes missing, Ruth finds herself in danger from a killer who knows she's getting ever closer to the truth...

Quercus

The Woman In Blue

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths
Quercus

Smoke and Mirrors

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

Brighton, winter 1951. Pantomime season is in full swing on the pier with Max Mephisto starring in Aladdin, but Max's headlines have been stolen by the disappearance ­­of two local children. When they are found dead in the snow, surrounded by sweets, it's not long before the press nickname them 'Hansel and Gretel'. DI Edgar Stephens has plenty of leads to investigate. The girl, Annie, used to write gruesome plays based on the Grimms' fairy tales. Does the clue lie in Annie's unfinished - and rather disturbing - last script? Or might it lie with the eccentric theatricals who have assembled for the pantomime? Once again Edgar enlists Max's help in penetrating the shadowy theatrical world that seems to hold the key. But is this all just classic misdirection?

Quercus

Ruth Galloway: The Early Cases

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths
Quercus

The Outcast Dead

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

WINNER OF THE 2016 CWA DAGGER IN THE LIBRARY. Historical crimes involving a Victorian child killer may hold the key to several contemporary deaths in this macabre outing for Dr Ruth Galloway, forensic archaeologist. Perfect for fans of Val McDermid and Ann Cleeves.'Told with a deepening sense of the unease, seasoned with a touch of the occult' Daily MailRuth has excavated a body from the grounds of Norwich Castle, which was once a prison. The body may be that of Victorian murderess Jemima Green. Called Mother Hook for her claw-like hand, Jemima was hanged for the murder of five children. DCI Harry Nelson has no time for long-ago killers. Investigating the case of three infants found dead, one after the other, in their King's Lynn home, he's convinced that their mother is responsible. Then a child goes missing. Could the abduction be linked to the long-dead Mother Hook? Ruth is pulled into the case, and back towards Nelson.

Quercus

One Summer in Tuscany

Domenica De Rosa
Authors:
Domenica De Rosa

Rivalries and romance in a Tuscan paradise. A relaxing writers' retreat? If only! Perfect holiday reading from Domenica de Rosa, author of the bestselling Dr Ruth Galloway series under the name Elly Griffiths. Previously published as SUMMER SCHOOL.Patricia Wilson's carefully composed ads for the writers' retreat she runs at her thirteenth-century Italian castle promise so much. But while the splendour of their surroundings and chef Aldo's melanzane never fail to wow the guests, huge maintenance bills and bad news from the bank threaten to close Patricia down. It's make or break time for the Castello.Each of her seven aspiring authors arrives with the inevitable baggage alongside their unpublished manuscripts. But this August something is different, and soon lifelong spinster Mary is riding on the back of Aldo's vespa, and smouldering odd-job man Fabio has set more than one heart racing.As temperatures rise, the writers gossip, flirt and gently polish their prose by the pool. But with ghosts, scorpions, and some unexpected visitors to contend with, one thing's for sure: neither the Castello, nor Patricia, has ever seen a summer like this.

Quercus

Ruth's First Christmas Tree

Elly Griffiths
Authors:
Elly Griffiths

It is three days before Christmas and a bitter wind is blowing across Norfolk.Until her daughter was born, forensic archaeologist Ruth Galloway didn't do Christmas, but now that Kate is a year old, she wants it to be special. She must get a tree, shop for food, clean the house, buy presents, including one for her new boyfriend - who she isn't even sure is her boyfriend - and remember to get the turkey out of the freezer.But time is rushing by and the best-laid plans don't always work out...

Welovethisbook.com

Q&A with Elly and Keith Walters

Elly Griffiths tells us about her fourth novel in the Ruth Galloway Investigation series, a possible BBC adaptation, and why she hates Time Team In A Room Full of Bones, new mother and forensic archeologist Ruth finds a museum curator dead ahead of the opening of a new medieval bones exhibition. How have the character dynamics changed now that Ruth Galloway’s one-year-old daughter Kate is around? It feels like a real privilege to have the time and space to develop the characters. It does get easier but I have to say that Kate was a challenge. I wanted her to be a distinct presence in Ruth’s life – every parent knows that a baby disrupts your life completely – but I didn’t want the books to become diatribes about the hardships of being a single parent. Are museums somewhere you spend a lot of time? I used to live in South London and visited the Horniman Museum in Forest Hill a few times. I have to say, though, that the museum that influenced me most is the Booth Museum in Hove. It’s very near my old school and I remember many happy stolen hours staring at the Great Auk... Was it always your intention to make Ruth dissimilar to traditional female detectives, with her clumsiness and weight issues? I just wanted to make her real. It wasn’t until after the book was published that I realised how many crime heroines were, in essence, superwomen – looking beautiful, cooking gourmet meals, running twenty miles before breakfast. Ruth could certainly eat a gourmet meal but she would struggle with the rest. Are the Rebus and Springsteen references in the books favourites of yours, as they appear to be the books and CDs of choice to Ruth Galloway? Do you have a favourite Boss album? Yes, I’m a big fan of both Ian Rankin and Bruce Springsteen. My favourite Springsteen album is Born to Run and my favourite track is Thunder Road. Are there any crime writers who have been a particular help or influence when you started out? I hadn’t read a lot of crime novels when I wrote The Crossing Places. My biggest influences were probably Victorian writers like Wilkie Collins. Since then I have met quite a few stars of the crime world and they have all been incredibly friendly and supportive. Val McDermid, in particular, has been delightful. Crime writers seem particularly charming. Maybe they exorcise all their demons in their books. I don’t know any Brighton-based writers, though I did meet Peter James when we were both shortlisted for the same award. You featured a location map in the first book, The Crossing Places, are there any plans to get maps into any future books? I love drawing maps and managed to get one into The House at Sea’s End. I think every book should have a map at the front. How do you write? My system hasn’t really changed. I write a rough chapter-by-chapter outline and then go for it. I write for about three hours a day and the rest of the time it’s going round in my head. I hope my plots have got a bit better as I’ve gone on though. Is Ruth going to be brought to the TV screen? The BBC has expressed interest, but I don’t think I’m allowed to say more than that. I would love to see Ruth on TV. Not sure who would play her, though... The location of your books is fantastic and they all give a tremendous sense of place - but could you ever see yourself writing Ruth into Brighton, or writing a standalone novel in Brighton? Or is your hometown too crowded with fictional crime already? Peter James does have Brighton sewn up and I’m sure I couldn’t better him. I do have a vague idea about a historical crime novel set in Brighton, though. My granddad was a music hall comedian and I’d love to write about that world. Ruth has no plans to leave Norfolk, although in book five she does visit Blackpool. Why does Ruth not like Time Team? Well, I have a bit of a grudge against Time Team, as my husband had a well-paid city job before he started watching it and now he’s a poorly-paid archaeologist! I think it’s a great programme, but Ruth, being a professional, would be rather sniffy about it (whilst, at the same time, watching it avidly). What can we look forward to next from Ruth Galloway or from Elly Griffiths? I’ve almost finished book five, which will be about Roman remains found near Blackpool. It takes Ruth into Nelson’s territory and, of course, into danger. I’ve already got a pretty good idea for Book 6. After that, who knows? A Room Full of Bones is out tomorrow, published by Quercus.

Elly Griffiths

Elly Griffiths was born in London. She worked in publishing for many years. Her bestselling series of Dr Ruth Galloway novels, featuring a forensic archaeologist, are set in Norfolk. The series has won the CWA Dagger in the library, and has been shortlisted three times for the Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. Her Stephens and Mephisto series is based in 1950s Brighton. She lives near Brighton with her husband, an archaeologist, and their two children.

First stop: Sweden

Discover Lisbeth Salander

The first stop on our summer reading round the world tour is Sweden, to visit the one and only Lisbeth Salander. Lisbeth stormed back into the bestseller charts last summer in the gripping fourth installment in the Millennium series, The Girl in the Spider's Web by David Lagercrantz. Here we talk to Team MacLehose about what they think makes Lisbeth so special... The typescripts of the first two and a half volumes of the Millennium trilogy that came from the Swedish publisher Norstedts came in English. The first book was then called MEN WHO HATE WOMEN, bizarrely translated by the French as MEN WHO DO NOT LOVE WOMEN. I have often wondered about the reactions of the many editors who read it before it came to the embryo MacLehose Press. I know of the response of one very distinguished American editor, who said that he had spent three weeks working on the first 70 pages, trying to edit them into shape, but it wasn’t worth the candle or he had no more time, I don’t remember which. The beginning of THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO, as it came to be known, is, it is true, unlike the rest of the novel. It covers ground that readers of modern crime stories will have found familiar. The first fifty pages of the novel betray almost no hint of the furnace of excitement to come. And then the reader meets Lisbeth Salander, a character who has no match in contemporary fiction, and from that moment Stieg Larsson and his Ariel-like spirit held the world in their hands, and still do. This wild, vengeful and exceedingly clever anarchist is a spirit for our times, a beautiful and brilliant creation. Impossible not to think of her own Prospero with terrible sadness even as we are reminded of Salander’s birthday. Of all the homages to the birthday girl, is there an apter one than Mario Vargas Llosa’s? The Nobel Laureate wrote: "I have just spent a few weeks with all of my experienced reader’s critical defences swept away by the cyclonic force of a story… Welcome to the immortality of fiction, Lisbeth Salander!" CHRISTOPHER MACLEHOSE, Publisher I was completely riveted by the sheer audacity of Larsson’s creation in Lisbeth Salander when I first read a proof copy of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. It must have been in the Autumn of 2007, a few months before she was revealed to English readers. A rare and memorable night of no sleep - I was in awe and in tatters. The attraction of a complex character who is so persistently underestimated, her projected appearance so deceptive – she’s tiny and a girl, she’s a punk, she’s damaged and in the care system. But this complexity transfers to strengths: she’s learned to rely on no-one, her tremendous skills are self-taught and she knows she has nothing to lose. She goes into Terminator Mode. There is something about the pace and poise of Larsson’s delivery that kept this reader entirely hooked. A line is played out and rapidly pulled in; Lisbeth disappears for long stretches of the narrative (for much of The Girl Who Played with Fire), from the investigative eye, from the reader’s page, but it is Lisbeth that we most want to read about. And Larsson delivers her to us at exactly the right moment – absence and reappearance. Silent cheers and goosebumps. A character of contrasts who reveals herself in a series of acts, the violence of which can appall. And yet she doesn’t lose us for a moment. In many crime novels the main protagonist/hero is sketched out at the beginning; a paragraph of past trauma, current addictions, complicated personal relationships. With Lisbeth, her persona shifts, her preferences are entirely unpredictable. I have never read a crime novel in which unpredictability becomes a strength. And yet, simultaneously, she possesses such extraordinary righteous integrity. Stieg Larsson makes all but the very finest of his competitors seem plodding and derivative, and with the creative brilliance of David Lagercrantz this most exceptional of heroines is brought back to life. More cheering and goosebumps. KATHARINA BIELENBERG, Associate Publisher, MacLehose Press