Related to: 'Inspirations behind Only Ever Yours'

riverrun

All Rivers Run Free

Natasha Carthew
Authors:
Natasha Carthew
riverrun

I'll Eat When I'm Dead

Barbara Bourland
Authors:
Barbara Bourland
riverrun

The Lonely Hearts Hotel

Heather O'Neill
Authors:
Heather O'Neill

'Joyful, funny and vividly alive' Emily St John Mandel'The Lonely Hearts Hotel sucked me right in and only got better and better . . . I began underlining truths I had hungered for' Miranda July'Makes me think of comets and live wires . . . raises goosebumps' Helen Oyeyemi'A fairytale laced with gunpowder' Kelly Link The Lonely Hearts Hotel is a love story with a difference. Set throughout the roaring twenties, it is a wicked fairytale of circus tricks and child prodigies, radical chorus girls, drug-addicted musicians and brooding clowns, set in an underworld whose economy hinges on the price of a kiss. It is the tale of two dreamers, abandoned in an orphanage where they were fated to meet. Here, in the face of cold, hunger and unpredictable beatings, Rose and Pierrot create a world of their own, shielding the spark of their curiosity from those whose jealousy will eventually tear them apart. When they meet again, each will have changed, having struggled through the Depression, through what they have done to fill the absence of the other. But their childhood vision remains - a dream to storm the world, a spectacle, an extravaganza that will lift them out of the gutter and onto a glittering stage. Heather O'Neill's pyrotechnical imagination and language are like no other. In this she has crafted a dazzling circus of a novel that takes us from the underbellies of war-time Montreal and Prohibition New York, to a theatre of magic where anything is possible - where an orphan girl can rule the world, and a ruined innocence can be redeemed.

Quercus

Shrill

Lindy West
Authors:
Lindy West
Quercus

Outstanding

Kathryn Flett
Authors:
Kathryn Flett
riverrun

Gold Fame Citrus

Claire Vaye Watkins
Authors:
Claire Vaye Watkins

'Extraordinary power and beauty' New York Times 'Disturbingly real' BBC 'A Mad Max world painted with a finer brush' Elle 'Laughter in the dark' FT 'Dizzying, scorching genius' Vanity FairDesert sands have laid waste to the south-west of America. Las Vegas is buried. California - and anyone still there - is stranded. Any way out is severely restricted. But Luz and Ray are not leaving. They survive on water rations, black market fruit and each other's need. Luz needs Ray, and Ray must be needed. But then they cross paths with a mysterious child, and the thirst for a better future begins. It's said there's a man on the edge of the Dune Sea. He leads a camp of believers. He can find water. Venturing into this dry heart of darkness, Luz thinks she has found their saviour. For the will to survive taps hidden powers; and the needed, and the needy, will exploit it.Like Margaret Atwood, Claire Vaye Watkins uses dystopia to traverse the scarred frontier of the heart, exploring the myths we tell about others and ourselves. In her bare and brilliant prose, nature and human nature, conspiracy and cult, motherhood and manhood are played out across the vast, implacable desert.

Jo Fletcher Books

Your Servants and Your People

David Towsey
Authors:
David Towsey
Jo Fletcher Books

Astra

Naomi Foyle
Authors:
Naomi Foyle
Jo Fletcher Books

Earth Cult

Trevor Hoyle
Authors:
Trevor Hoyle

The Mountain of the Holy Cross near Roaring Fork, Colorado, has been held sacred by generations of followers of the Telluric Faith. But now the mountain is a temple of science, for deep within the ancient rock lies the Solar Neutrino Research Station. The Tellurians - and their gods - aren't happy.Since the Station started operating, strange and inexplicable events have been happening in Gypsum, the isolated town dominated by the towering peak. There are violent earth tremors and freak electrical storms, and people are dying from radiation. When science journalist Frank Kersh arrives to report on the Station's work he begins to draw some very unscientific conclusions about the research programme - and soon he is involved in a maelstrom of savage violence and destruction as an apocalyptic Tellurian prophet foretells the end of the world.Maybe the Tellurians aren't crazy after all . . .

riverrun

Only Ever Yours YA edition

Louise O'Neill
Authors:
Louise O'Neill
Jo Fletcher Books

A Spaceship Built of Stone and Other Stories

Lisa Tuttle
Authors:
Lisa Tuttle

'Tuttle is at her best as a short story writer. The power and sheer quality of her work are unmistakable on every page' Science Fiction & Fantasy Book Review. Containing 'Wives', a classic in feminist science fiction and the author's most frequently discussed and reprinted short story, and 'The Bone Flute', which was famously awarded and then removed from the Nebula Awards, Lisa Tuttle's second short-story collection is as breathtaking and genre bending as the first.Originally published by The Woman's Press, a specialised feminist publishing company in 1987, A Spaceship Built of Stones contains 10 short stories that demonstrate Tuttle's effortless mastery of the short story form and her undeniable writing prowess. The collection also includes the stories 'No Regrets', 'The Family Monkey', 'Mrs T', 'A Spaceship Built of Stone', 'The Cure', 'The Hollow Man', 'The Other Kind' and 'The Birds of the Moon'.

riverrun

Toploader

Ed O'Loughlin
Authors:
Ed O'Loughlin

Flora is a plucky teenage girl.Cobra is a double agent.Flint Driscoll is a reporter.Captain Smith is a military man.Moon is a bored drone pilot.Daddy Jesus is an inflictor of pain.They were never expected to meet, except for one farcical war . . .

MacLehose Press

Stieg Larsson, My Friend

Kurdo Baksi
Authors:
Kurdo Baksi

Five years after his death, Stieg Larsson is best known as the author of the Millennium Trilogy, but during his career as a journalist he was a crucial protagonist in the battle against racism and for democracy in Sweden, and one of the founders of the anti-facist magazine Expo. Kurdo Baksi first met Larsson in 1992; it was the beginning of an intense friendship, and a fruitful but challenging working relationship. In this candid and rounded memoir, Baksi answers the questions a multitude of Larsson's fans have already asked, about his upbringing; the recurring death threats; his insomnia and his vices; his feminism - so evident in his books - and his dogmatism. What was he like as a colleague? Who provided the inspiration for his now-immortal characters (Baksi is one of the few who appears in the trilogy as himself)? Who was Lisbeth Salander?

Louise O'Neill

Louise O'Neill is the feminist powerhouse and outspoken voice for change whose novels Only Ever Yours and Asking for It helped to start important conversations about body image and consent. Asking for It won Book of the Year at the Irish Book Awards 2015 and stayed in the Irish Top Ten fiction chart for over a year. Only Ever Yours won Newcomer of the Year at the Irish Book Awards and the Bookseller YA Prize. Film/TV rights have been optioned on both books. Louise lives and works in West Cork, Ireland. She contributes regularly to Irish TV and radio, and has a weekly column in the Irish Examiner.

Jessica Cornwell talks about her inspiration for writing her new novel, The Serpent Papers.

Writing The Serpent Papers

When I set out to write a novel, the first thing I encountered in the dark recess of my imagination was a man. His name was Ferran Fons, and he was a lonely, aging, professor at a drama school in Barcelona. Fons had an office window facing the theatre across the courtyard and so he spent the majority of his day staring at an enormous poster hanging from the wall of the building. The poster featured a portrait of a beautiful young woman. Her name – I knew in a flash – was Natalia Hernandez. And very soon she was going to die. In the weeks and months following my discovery of Natalia Hernandez, I found myself writing a mystery. New characters sprang into being – the irascible Inspector Fabregat with his love of rich food and distaste for murder – tormented by the unsolved deaths of four young women, bodies tattooed with cryptic letters, tongues cut from their mouths. Next came Rex Illuminatus: a thirteenth century Majorcan mystic who hid The Serpent Papers beneath an alchemical scrawl, secreting away an ancient manuscript written in the language of witches. Anna Verco presented herself as a young, American academic whose psychic abilities and quest to find the Serpent Papers lead her into the drawing room of Inspector Fabregat… a decade after the murder of Natalia Hernandez. I had not set out to write a thriller, but suddenly I was. Not only that, but I knew, without doubt, upon finding Anna, that I was also writing a trilogy. I read and reread the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. While making notes in the margin of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s A Study in Scarlet, I repeatedly returned to Wilkie Collin’s The Moonstone and the gothic novels of Horace Walpole and Mary Shelley. I wanted to write a contemporary thriller that had its roots in nineteenth century crime, so I analyzed the structure of the gothic novel, and decided that the first pulp books had evolved into vampire stories and then into serial killer narratives. I set the book in Barcelona’s gothic quarters, with its air of supernatural menace. Amidst the distinct flavor of an old, and violent, fairy tale – I saw Anna Vero driving the action forward. I loved her feminism, her single mindedness, her independence and focus, and how little she wanted to share of herself. Anna takes her lead from The Killing’s Sarah Lund, The Bridge’s Saga Norén (with whom I am completely obsessed) and Lisbeth Salander – the queens of Scandi Noir – but she’s also a very different interpretation of the genre’s damaged ‘woman detective’ or female protagonist. She blends the supernatural and the hyper-real, and in that way I think she’s quite original – and genre-bending. She also consistently surprises me, leading me on unexpected adventures into Palaeography courses at Senate House in London, the Manuscript room at the British Library, and up rocky Majorcan trails in the pouring rain. Throughout, Anna Verco remains deliciously, autonomously her own.

Kathryn Flett

Kathryn Flett is a journalist who has written for numerous international publications and makes regular TV and radio appearances as a critic and pundit. She was the TV critic for the Observer for ten years and currently writes a restaurant review column, Table for Two, for the Sunday Telegraph. Outstanding is her second novel. She lives (with her two sons, Jackson and Rider, her partner, the photographer Julian Anderson, two cats and a whippet called Slim), in St-Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex.

Lindy West

Lindy West is a Seattle-based writer and performer whose work focuses on pop culture, feminism, social justice, humour and body image. Currently a weekly columnist at the Guardian and culture writer for GQ magazine, she was previously one of the most popular and prolific writers at feminist blog Jezebel.com. Lindy's articles typically generate thousands of shares and retweets. In January 2015 her exposure was magnified by a segment aired on US national radio in which she confronted an internet troll who'd impersonated her dead father. The podcast and ensuing article went viral and were shared more than 85,000 times worldwide, gaining Lindy countless new followers. As a live performer and commentator, Lindy has made numerous appearances on radio and TV, and regularly speaks at academic events, conferences and literary festivals. In 2013, she won a Social Media Award from NYC's Women's Media Center, was selected for the Nation's top ten feminist articles of the year and New Statesman's top 20 best online pieces of the year, and was profiled by Cosmopolitan magazine.

Richard M. Restak

Dr Restak is a graduate of Georgetown University School of Medicine. His post-graduate training included a rotating internship at St Vincent's Hospital in New York, psychiatric residencies at Mount Sinai Hospital and Georgetown University Hospital, and a residency in neurology at George Washington Hospital in Washington, DC. Concurrently, he is Clinical Professor of Neurology at George Washington Hospital University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He has written numerous books on the human brain.

www.theguardian.com

Guardian Children's Fiction Prize 2014: Piers Torday wins for 'Wildly Inventive' adventure

Piers Torday has scooped the award every author dreams of adding to their trophy cabinet and has been crowned winner of the Guardian children’s fiction prize for his book The Dark Wild, the sequel to his debut novel The Last Wild. He wins £1,500 along with the respect of his fellow writers, as this is the only children’s book prize judged by authors. Young critic Petros Bougheas, 10, found that The Dark Wild “grabbed me by the scruff of the neck and hauled me into its pages” and Nightingale Academy’s book group said: “From the vivid style to the inventive storyline, the audience goes through mixed emotions… The moral woven into the book is that if we do not respect wildlife, then wildlife will not respect us and this is described using an imaginative dystopian background.”

My Journey To Feminism

Teen author Louise O’Neill was 15 when she first used the F-word and called herself a feminist – but didn’t understand what it meant and remained ashamed of the parts of herself that were female, here’s her story and why she wrote Only Ever Yours